Colloquium - Yi Luo (Hefei National Laboratory, China and Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden) Light-matter Interaction at the Nanoscale

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Yi Luo Hefei National Lab, China and Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
November 22, 2016
4:00PM - 5:00PM
Location
1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2016-11-22 16:00:00 2016-11-22 17:00:00 Colloquium - Yi Luo (Hefei National Laboratory, China and Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden) Light-matter Interaction at the Nanoscale

A metallic nanocavity can squeeze the visible light into highly confined intensive plasmon with a broad energy distribution. Such a unique excitation source can lead to many exciting new applications. One of the representative applications is the well-established surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that takes advantage of the high intensity of the plasmon to achieve effective detection of a very small numbers of molecules. I will present here our several new exciting findings from the use of NCP. Our combined theoretical and experimental studies reveal that the NCP acts like a tunable, strong and ultra-fast electromagnetic source that can naturally alter the color of the emission of a molecule[1,2]. The amplified light emission of the molecule enables us to image the coherent dipole-dipole interaction between molecules[3]. Moreover, we found that the NCP can even produce a completely new physical process, namely the nonlinear inelastic electron scattering[4]. We have also developed a new theory that takes into account the locality of the highly confined field to describe the light-matter interaction[4], which has successfully reproduced experimentally observed super high spatial resolution Raman images of a molecule, below one nanometer [5]. It is found that the non-resonant Raman images should be capable of revealing the vibrational modes of the molecule in real space[4b].

References:

1.        Z.C. Dong, et al. Nature Photonics, 4 (2010) 50

2.        (a) G.J. Tian, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 177401; (b) G.J. Tian, et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 52 (2013) 4814

3.        Y. Zhang, et al., Nature, 531 (2016) 623

4.        C.K. Xu, et al. Nature Physics, 10 (2014) 753.

5.        (a) S. Duan, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 137(2015) 9515; (b) S. Duan, et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 128 (2016) 1053.

6.        R. Zhang, et al. Nature, 498 (2013) 82; S. Jiang, et al. Nature Nanotechnology, 10, (2015) 865 

1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium Department of Physics physics@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

A metallic nanocavity can squeeze the visible light into highly confined intensive plasmon with a broad energy distribution. Such a unique excitation source can lead to many exciting new applications. One of the representative applications is the well-established surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that takes advantage of the high intensity of the plasmon to achieve effective detection of a very small numbers of molecules. I will present here our several new exciting findings from the use of NCP. Our combined theoretical and experimental studies reveal that the NCP acts like a tunable, strong and ultra-fast electromagnetic source that can naturally alter the color of the emission of a molecule[1,2]. The amplified light emission of the molecule enables us to image the coherent dipole-dipole interaction between molecules[3]. Moreover, we found that the NCP can even produce a completely new physical process, namely the nonlinear inelastic electron scattering[4]. We have also developed a new theory that takes into account the locality of the highly confined field to describe the light-matter interaction[4], which has successfully reproduced experimentally observed super high spatial resolution Raman images of a molecule, below one nanometer [5]. It is found that the non-resonant Raman images should be capable of revealing the vibrational modes of the molecule in real space[4b].

References:

1.        Z.C. Dong, et al. Nature Photonics, 4 (2010) 50

2.        (a) G.J. Tian, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 177401; (b) G.J. Tian, et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 52 (2013) 4814

3.        Y. Zhang, et al., Nature, 531 (2016) 623

4.        C.K. Xu, et al. Nature Physics, 10 (2014) 753.

5.        (a) S. Duan, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 137(2015) 9515; (b) S. Duan, et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 128 (2016) 1053.

6.        R. Zhang, et al. Nature, 498 (2013) 82; S. Jiang, et al. Nature Nanotechnology, 10, (2015) 865