Colloquium Cancelled- Vladan Vuletic (MIT) Entanglement of 3000 Atoms by One Photon

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Vladen Vuletic (MIT)
February 14, 2017
4:00PM - 5:00PM
Location
1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2017-02-14 16:00:00 2017-02-14 17:00:00 Colloquium Cancelled- Vladan Vuletic (MIT) Entanglement of 3000 Atoms by One Photon

Quantum-mechanically correlated (entangled) states of many particles are of interest for quantum information, quantum computing and quantum metrology. Only recently has it become possible to generate many-atom entangled states, and to use them to outperform measurements done with collections of independent atoms. Here we generate entanglement in a large atomic ensemble via an interaction with a very weak laser pulse; remarkably, the detection of a single photon prepares several thousand atoms in an entangled state. We reconstruct a negative-valued quasiprobability function, a hallmark of non-classicality, and verify that at least 2,900 out of 3,100 atoms must be entangled with one another. Furthermore we discuss prospects for generating more and more complex entangled states that can be used to improve quantum measurements.

 

1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium Department of Physics physics@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Quantum-mechanically correlated (entangled) states of many particles are of interest for quantum information, quantum computing and quantum metrology. Only recently has it become possible to generate many-atom entangled states, and to use them to outperform measurements done with collections of independent atoms. Here we generate entanglement in a large atomic ensemble via an interaction with a very weak laser pulse; remarkably, the detection of a single photon prepares several thousand atoms in an entangled state. We reconstruct a negative-valued quasiprobability function, a hallmark of non-classicality, and verify that at least 2,900 out of 3,100 atoms must be entangled with one another. Furthermore we discuss prospects for generating more and more complex entangled states that can be used to improve quantum measurements.