Colloquium - Michael Strickland (Kent State University) - Quantum Chromodynamics at Five Trillion Degrees Kelvin

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Michael Strickland - January 27,2015 colloquium speaker
January 27, 2015
4:00PM - 5:00PM
Location
1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45 pm in the Atrium

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2015-01-27 16:00:00 2015-01-27 17:00:00 Colloquium - Michael Strickland (Kent State University) - Quantum Chromodynamics at Five Trillion Degrees Kelvin

Relativistic heavy ion collision experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at CERN have made it possible to turn back the clock to approximately one-millionth of a second after the big bang; a time when matter, as we know it, did not exist.  At these early times, the temperature of the universe was on the order of 10^12 Kelvin and the protons and neutrons, which now constitute atomic nuclei, had not yet been formed. Instead, the universe was a super hot plasma of quarks and gluons called the quark gluon plasma (QGP).  In this colloquium I will review the theoretical tools necessary to understand the quark gluon plasma in the early universe and formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.  I will also discuss a few key heavy-ion experimental observables such as collective flow, jet energy loss, and heavy quarkonium suppression, which all point to the creation of a QGP with an initial temperature on the order of 600 MeV at the LHC.

1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45 pm in the Atrium Department of Physics physics@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Relativistic heavy ion collision experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at CERN have made it possible to turn back the clock to approximately one-millionth of a second after the big bang; a time when matter, as we know it, did not exist.  At these early times, the temperature of the universe was on the order of 10^12 Kelvin and the protons and neutrons, which now constitute atomic nuclei, had not yet been formed. Instead, the universe was a super hot plasma of quarks and gluons called the quark gluon plasma (QGP).  In this colloquium I will review the theoretical tools necessary to understand the quark gluon plasma in the early universe and formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.  I will also discuss a few key heavy-ion experimental observables such as collective flow, jet energy loss, and heavy quarkonium suppression, which all point to the creation of a QGP with an initial temperature on the order of 600 MeV at the LHC.