Colloquium - Michael Lisa (The Ohio State University) Subatomic Swirls: Nuclear Collisions & the Most Vortical Fluid

Image
Image
Michael Lisa - The Ohio State University - 10/31/17 colloquium speaker
October 31, 2017
3:45PM - 4:45PM
Location
1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:30 pm in the Atrium

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2017-10-31 15:45:00 2017-10-31 16:45:00 Colloquium - Michael Lisa (The Ohio State University) Subatomic Swirls: Nuclear Collisions & the Most Vortical Fluid

Ultra-relativistic collisions between heavy nuclei produce the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a unique state of matter that characterized the early universe for the first few microseconds after the Big Bang.  Among the most surprising results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was the discovery that the QGP acts like a fluid with remarkable properties.  A hydrodynamic treatment is now the standard paradigm in probing the bulk properties of the Strong Force in nuclear collisions.  I will discuss a recent discovery by the STAR Collaboration that probes for the first time the vorticity of the fluid produced in these collisions.  These unique results provide a clear validation of the hydrodynamic picture, while at the same time opening a new window in the study of Quantum Chromodynamics through nuclear collisions.  The story of this discovery involves several interesting connections to the OSU physics department.

1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:30 pm in the Atrium Department of Physics physics@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Ultra-relativistic collisions between heavy nuclei produce the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a unique state of matter that characterized the early universe for the first few microseconds after the Big Bang.  Among the most surprising results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was the discovery that the QGP acts like a fluid with remarkable properties.  A hydrodynamic treatment is now the standard paradigm in probing the bulk properties of the Strong Force in nuclear collisions.  I will discuss a recent discovery by the STAR Collaboration that probes for the first time the vorticity of the fluid produced in these collisions.  These unique results provide a clear validation of the hydrodynamic picture, while at the same time opening a new window in the study of Quantum Chromodynamics through nuclear collisions.  The story of this discovery involves several interesting connections to the OSU physics department.