Colloquium - Joseph Eberly (University of Rochester) - Does Classical Entanglement Shift the Quantum-Classical Boundary?

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Joseph Eberly
April 19, 2016
4:00PM - 5:00PM
Location
1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2016-04-19 16:00:00 2016-04-19 17:00:00 Colloquium - Joseph Eberly (University of Rochester) - Does Classical Entanglement Shift the Quantum-Classical Boundary?

Entanglement in classical physics is becoming widely recognized as real, and applications are being pursued. A basic question is whether the emergence of this 'quantum' property in classical contexts has any influence on the much discussed but little agreed-on location of the boundary between classical and quantum domains. Experimental tests of Bell Inequalities using entirely classical approaches have begun to appear. We will explain why violations of the best tested (CHSH) Bell Inequality should be expected to be possible with classical means. We will describe the results of an initial experiment in this direction, using classical observation of classical optical fields instead of photon production and photon counting, while remaining within the Bell-Shimony theoretical constraints.

1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium Department of Physics physics@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Entanglement in classical physics is becoming widely recognized as real, and applications are being pursued. A basic question is whether the emergence of this 'quantum' property in classical contexts has any influence on the much discussed but little agreed-on location of the boundary between classical and quantum domains. Experimental tests of Bell Inequalities using entirely classical approaches have begun to appear. We will explain why violations of the best tested (CHSH) Bell Inequality should be expected to be possible with classical means. We will describe the results of an initial experiment in this direction, using classical observation of classical optical fields instead of photon production and photon counting, while remaining within the Bell-Shimony theoretical constraints.