Colloquium - Comert Kural (The Ohio State University) - Mechanobiology of a Cellular Uptake Pathway in Developing Tissues

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Comert Kural
March 22, 2016
4:00PM - 5:00PM
Location
1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2016-03-22 16:00:00 2016-03-22 17:00:00 Colloquium - Comert Kural (The Ohio State University) - Mechanobiology of a Cellular Uptake Pathway in Developing Tissues

Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the best characterized and most extensively studied mechanism by which cells internalize molecules from their environment. The interplay between mechanical forces and dynamics of the molecular assemblies performing the internalization has important roles during development of complex multicellular organisms. Due to technical limitations, however, effects of mechanical cues generated during development of organisms on formation and dissolution of internalization agents are not characterized. In the first part of my talk, I will focus on the strategies we developed for determining the variations in clathrin dynamics within tissues of a developing fly embryo. In the second part, I will highlight our work on characterizing the tension-based regulation of internalization dynamics and our long term aims for utilizing this information as non-invasive membrane tension sensors applicable to tissues. 

1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium Department of Physics physics@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the best characterized and most extensively studied mechanism by which cells internalize molecules from their environment. The interplay between mechanical forces and dynamics of the molecular assemblies performing the internalization has important roles during development of complex multicellular organisms. Due to technical limitations, however, effects of mechanical cues generated during development of organisms on formation and dissolution of internalization agents are not characterized. In the first part of my talk, I will focus on the strategies we developed for determining the variations in clathrin dynamics within tissues of a developing fly embryo. In the second part, I will highlight our work on characterizing the tension-based regulation of internalization dynamics and our long term aims for utilizing this information as non-invasive membrane tension sensors applicable to tissues.