Colloquium - Bruce Weinberg (The Ohio State University) - The Economic Value STEM Training and Research: Initial Analyses

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Bruce Weinberg
March 1, 2016
4:00PM - 5:00PM
Location
1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2016-03-01 16:00:00 2016-03-01 17:00:00 Colloquium - Bruce Weinberg (The Ohio State University) - The Economic Value STEM Training and Research: Initial Analyses

For eight universities, we combine data from the UMETRICS project, which provided administrative records on graduate students supported by funded research, with data from the U.S. Census Bureau. We study the teams on which graduate students train and initial earnings and placement outcomes. Almost 40% of supported doctorate recipients, entered industry and, when they did, they disproportionately got jobs at large and high-wage establishments in high-tech and professional service industries. Although Ph.D. recipients spread nationally, there was also geographic clustering in employment near the universities that trained and employed the researchers. We also show large gender differences across fields in early career outcomes. 

1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium Department of Physics physics@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

For eight universities, we combine data from the UMETRICS project, which provided administrative records on graduate students supported by funded research, with data from the U.S. Census Bureau. We study the teams on which graduate students train and initial earnings and placement outcomes. Almost 40% of supported doctorate recipients, entered industry and, when they did, they disproportionately got jobs at large and high-wage establishments in high-tech and professional service industries. Although Ph.D. recipients spread nationally, there was also geographic clustering in employment near the universities that trained and employed the researchers. We also show large gender differences across fields in early career outcomes.