Colloquium - Amy Connolly (The Ohio State University) Seeking Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Antarctica with the Radio Detection Technique

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Amy Connolly
September 20, 2016
4:00PM - 5:00PM
Location
1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2016-09-20 16:00:00 2016-09-20 17:00:00 Colloquium - Amy Connolly (The Ohio State University) Seeking Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Antarctica with the Radio Detection Technique

Ultra-high energy neutrinos (> 1018 eV) are uniquely capable of probing the most energetic astrophysics sources at cosmic distances, and are crucial for identifying the origin of the highest energy cosmic rays. Their interactions occur at center-of-mass energies that exceed those that can be produced at current particle accelerators. The IceCube Neutrino Observatory at South Pole has recently announced the first measurements of a neutrino flux of astrophysical origin up to approximately 1015 eV through an optical signature. In the last two decades, the radio technique has emerged as the most promising way to reach the necessary sensitivity to detect enough neutrinos in the UHE regime to extract the wealth of information that they carry about astrophysics and particle physics. I will present the latest developments in the field in terms of the experiments, analytical techniques and theoretical groundwork that are bringing us ever closer to the era of UHE neutrino astronomy, with a focus on the central contributions of our group here at OSU.

1080 Physics Research Building - Smith Seminar Room - reception at 3:45pm in the Atrium Department of Physics physics@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Ultra-high energy neutrinos (> 1018 eV) are uniquely capable of probing the most energetic astrophysics sources at cosmic distances, and are crucial for identifying the origin of the highest energy cosmic rays. Their interactions occur at center-of-mass energies that exceed those that can be produced at current particle accelerators. The IceCube Neutrino Observatory at South Pole has recently announced the first measurements of a neutrino flux of astrophysical origin up to approximately 1015 eV through an optical signature. In the last two decades, the radio technique has emerged as the most promising way to reach the necessary sensitivity to detect enough neutrinos in the UHE regime to extract the wealth of information that they carry about astrophysics and particle physics. I will present the latest developments in the field in terms of the experiments, analytical techniques and theoretical groundwork that are bringing us ever closer to the era of UHE neutrino astronomy, with a focus on the central contributions of our group here at OSU.