Ohio State scientists part of new $3.7M project to advance nuclear physics experiments

June 9, 2020

Ohio State scientists part of new $3.7M project to advance nuclear physics experiments

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Furnstahl and Heinz
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Three College of Arts and Sciences researchers are key members of a new, $3.7 million, multi-institution effort to develop software that can create more accurate models of scientific phenomena, such as what happened immediately after the Big Bang or how long a radioactive nucleus will live before it decays. 

Richard Furnstahl, professor in the Department of PhysicsUlrich Heinz, Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Physics; and Matthew Pratola, associate professor in the Department of Statistics are principal investigators on a new National Science Fo­­undation-funded project, the Bayesian Analysis of Nuclear Dynamics (BAND) framework. The collaboration will provide a publicly available set of computational tools for physicists seeking to solve a wide variety of nuclear-physics research questions and includes statisticians, computer scientists and nuclear physicists from Ohio University, Michigan State University and Northwestern University.

The project is focused on creating better predictive models of scientific phenomena nuclear physicists seek to understand. Because current models can yield different forecasts, scientists hope the project improves what they call the “Uncertainty Quantification” for a range of nuclear processes.

Read more:  https://artsandsciences.osu.edu/news/band-physics-collaboration