Quantum Matter Seminar- Rahul Nandkishore- Ergodicity Breaking in Quantum Dynamics

Photo of Rahul in front of a plain chalkboard
October 23, 2023
4:00PM - 5:00PM
1080 Physics Research Building

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2023-10-23 16:00:00 2023-10-23 17:00:00 Quantum Matter Seminar- Rahul Nandkishore- Ergodicity Breaking in Quantum Dynamics Professor Rahul Nandkishore University of Colorado- Boulder Ergodicity Breaking in Quantum Dynamics Location: 1080 Physics Research Building, Smith Seminar Room Faculty Host: Brian Skinner/ Yuan-Ming Lu 1080 Physics Research Building Department of Physics physics@osu.edu America/New_York public

Professor Rahul Nandkishore

University of Colorado- Boulder

Ergodicity Breaking in Quantum Dynamics

Location: 1080 Physics Research Building, Smith Seminar Room

Faculty Host: Brian Skinner/ Yuan-Ming Lu

Photo of Rahul in front of a plain chalkboard

Abstract: I discuss three robust routes to ergodicity breaking in quantum dynamics: many body localization, fractonic symmetries, and higher form symmetries. I’ll explain how each of these works, their key properties, and degree of robustness. 

Bio: Rahul Nandkishore is a theoretical physicist interested in a broad range of problems, from non-equilibrium quantum dynamics, to exotic phases of matter, to effects arising from interplay of interactions and disorder in both solid state and synthetic quantum systems. He received his PhD in 2012 from MIT, then spent three years at the Princeton Center for Theoretical Science as a postdoctoral fellow, before moving to a faculty position at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he has been ever since. He is Associate Professor of Physics at Boulder, and Director of the Boulder Center for Theory of Quantum Matter.  He is known for his work on graphene and Dirac semimetals, on many body localization, on fracton phases of matter, and on constrained quantum dynamics. His research has been recognized by numerous awards including Young Investigator awards from the U.S. Department of Defense, a Sloan Research Fellowship, and a Simons Fellowship in Theoretical Physics.