BioPhysics seminar - Guillaume Lambert (Cornell University) Quantitative Single-Cell BioPhysics

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Guillaume Lambert (Cornell University) 10/24/18 BioPhysics Seminar speaker
October 24, 2018
12:00PM - 1:00PM
Location
Smith Seminar room, 1080 Physics Research Building

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2018-10-24 12:00:00 2018-10-24 13:00:00 BioPhysics seminar - Guillaume Lambert (Cornell University) Quantitative Single-Cell BioPhysics

Complex behaviors in bacteria (e.g. pathogenicity, antibiotic resistance, gene regulation and cell-fate decisions) often arise from cell-to-cell variability within members of a population. Consequently, to understand and ultimately control active biological processes, information about microorganisms must be gathered at the single-cell level and in real time. To this end, we combine tools from Physics, Bioengineering, and Synthetic Biology to monitor the response of individual bacteria subjected to environmental fluctuations. Ongoing research projects that will be discussed in this talk include: 1) the study of the survival strategies used by bacteria in response to toxic environments, and 2) the development of robust biological computational elements based on synthetic CRISPR-Cas transcription factors.

Smith Seminar room, 1080 Physics Research Building Department of Physics physics@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Complex behaviors in bacteria (e.g. pathogenicity, antibiotic resistance, gene regulation and cell-fate decisions) often arise from cell-to-cell variability within members of a population. Consequently, to understand and ultimately control active biological processes, information about microorganisms must be gathered at the single-cell level and in real time. To this end, we combine tools from Physics, Bioengineering, and Synthetic Biology to monitor the response of individual bacteria subjected to environmental fluctuations. Ongoing research projects that will be discussed in this talk include: 1) the study of the survival strategies used by bacteria in response to toxic environments, and 2) the development of robust biological computational elements based on synthetic CRISPR-Cas transcription factors.